BROWNED BONE BROTH


Healing foods can come from surprising sources. Bones commonly thrown away from meals can get a second life, if saved, and made into a hearty browned bone broth. Chefs and grandmothers nod their heads in agreement when we say that homemade broth from quality ingredients can heal the digestive tract, repair skin and repair arthritis. This almost-free recipe should be a regular habit for all diabetics.

 

HEALING BENEFITS

Broth made from the bones of animals raised on a healthy diet provides deep rich flavor to recipes and countless nutritional benefits. Simmering the bones over low heat for hours brings out high amounts of rich collagen, providing for stronger bones, full-bodied hair and superior skin health. Store bought broth is much lower in nutrients compared to homemade broth. Save all your animal bones from past meals in your freezer and make a batch of bone broth every few weeks. Your body will thank you for it.

 

PUTTING IT ALTOGETHER

Follow the instructions below to make this nutritional elixir. If you are in a hurry you can skip the optional steps of browning the bones in the oven. Taking the extra hour to brown the bones will develop more deep, complex flavors to your future soups and recipes.

It’s good practice to pull out all the pots and pans you need before cooking. Likewise, pulling out the ingredients you need to measure or chop beforehand will simplify your cooking. The French call this practice mise en place which translates to “putting in place”. It is practiced in restaurants and taught to chefs in culinary school.

Bone Broth i

We save all our bones from meals and crock pot recipes in the freezer. If you have enough bones try separating them out by animal type. Pictured above are mostly chicken bones. Poultry bones do well alone. Fish bones also should be kept to their own recipe. (Do not use this recipe for fish, just poultry and/or other land animals.) When we dine out at a restaurant I always ask for all the bones on the table in a to-go box. It’s the cheapest way to hoard get a lot of bones at once. In a pinch, ask your butcher or look in the meat freezers at your grocery stores for bones being sold. A few bucks will usually get you a pound or two.

The aromatics can be cut quickly and coarsely. Since the celery, onion, carrots and garlic get added later in the recipe you can even hold off on cutting these until a day after starting this recipe. Uncooked vegetable scraps, from earlier recipes, can be frozen and pulled out for this healing crock pot brew. However, some vegetables are good for bone broth while others are not. (Compost the ones that are not good for stock.) Reference the lists below:

GOOD FOR STOCK

  • Onions
  • Squash
  • Celery
  • Carrots
  • Garlic
  • Herbs
  • Fennel
  • Asparagus

BAD FOR STOCK

  • Mushrooms
  • Broccoli
  • Beets
  • Brussel Sprouts
  • Cauliflower
  • Cabbage
  • Artichokes

Optional: Preheat your oven to 400°F. Arrange your frozen bones on a cookie sheet or an oven-proof pan. Cover with the 1 tbsp of olive oil and place in the oven for about one hour. Stir bones once or twice during the hour. For those who take the time for this extra step you will be rewarded with a more complex and savory flavor in your broth.

Add the bones, browned or not, to a large crock pot. You can use a large stock pot if you do not have a crock pot. Cover the bones with cold, filtered water. Add the apple cider vinegar and optional bay leaf and thyme. Set the crock pot to high for at least 24 hours. Or bring your stock pot on the stove to a low rolling boil, uncovered. Check on the bones every 6-12 hours. Skim the fat from the top and add more water as needed.

After the bones have boiled for 24 hours, add in the aromatics. Place the optional garlic, carrot, onion and celery in your pot of choice. Also, add more water if needed. Allow to continue boiling for another 8-12 hours.

The bone broth will be fragrant after so many hours of  boiling. There is no discernible way to declare broth being done. Time is your only indicator for calling it ready. After at least 32 hours, turn the heat source off and allow it to cool for 15-30 mins. First start by removing the bones and aromatics with a pair of kitchen tongs. Then use a ladle and a metal colander (or a fat separator) to separate the rest of the bones and aromatics from the broth. Discard the bones and aromatics into your trash. It is ideal to pour your concentrated, healing broth into smaller containers for freezing. Defrosting smaller containers is quicker and most recipes only call for 1-2 cups of broth at a time.

Fat Separating: There’s two directions you can take when finishing your broth. Dr. Valerie would use the fat separator, with the plug in the spout, to make a lower fat and calorie broth. This is the best route for those trying to cut their calorie intake and lose weight. Here’s a good how-to video. If you do not have a fancy fat separator, just use your refrigerator and some time. Strain the larger pieces from the broth and pour into a wide-mouthed bowl or individual jars. Place in the refrigerator overnight and the fat will settle at the top. The next day you can scrape the visible white layer of fat off the top and discard it. Personally, I prefer leaving the fat in the broth. While it does add more calories, I always dilute it down with water (1:1 broth to water) for recipes. The fat is from a healthy source so it is good for you, in small doses, and adds lots of flavor.

Bone Broth iii

 

BROWNED BONE BROTH
 
Prep time
Cook time
Total time
 
Healing foods can come from surprising sources. Bones commonly thrown away from meals can get a second life, if saved, and made into a hearty browned bone broth. Chefs and grandmothers nod their heads in agreement when we say that homemade broth from quality ingredients can heal the digestive tract, repair skin and repair arthritis. This almost-free recipe should be a regular habit for all diabetics.
Author:
Recipe type: Soup
Cuisine: American
Serves: 8c
Ingredients
  • Poultry Bones, NO ANTIBIOTICS, 3-4 lbs
  • Olive Oil, 1 tbsp
  • Carrots, Coarsely Chopped, 3X
  • Celery Stalks, Coarsely Chopped, ORGANIC, 4X
  • Onion (Medium), Coarsely Chopped, 2X
  • Apple Cider Vinegar, ORGANIC, 2 tbsp
  • Optional: Bay Leaf, 1X
  • Optional: Garlic Cloves, 2X
  • Optional: Spring of Thyme
Instructions
  1. Optional: Preheat your oven to 400°F. Arrange your frozen bones on a cookie sheet or an oven-proof pan. Cover with the 1 tbsp of olive oil and place in the oven for about one hour.
  2. Add the bones to a large crock pot. Cover the bones with cold, filtered water. Add the apple cider vinegar and optional bay leaf and thyme. Set the crock pot to high for at least 24 hours.
  3. Check on the bones every 6-12 hours. Skim the fat from the top and add more water as needed.
  4. After the bones have boiled for 24 hours, add in the aromatics. Place the optional garlic, carrot, onion and celery in your pot of choice. Also, add more water if needed. Allow to continue boiling for another 8-12 hours.
  5. First start by removing as many bones and aromatics with a pair of kitchen tongs. Then use a ladle and a metal colander (or a fat separator) to separate the rest of the bones and aromatics from the broth.
  6. Pour your concentrated, healing broth into smaller containers for freezing.

Leave a Reply

Your email address will not be published.

Rate this recipe: